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Human Space Flight Collection

Information on the Human Space Flight Collection at the UHCL Archives and Special Collections; created by Erin Henry and Matthew M. Peek

HSF Collections by Name, A-L

  • Apollo Trajectory Charts
    • Primarily a collection of Apollo earth, lunar, and translunar/transearth trajectory charts. Also contains a table of manned spaceflight tracking sites. Possibly belonged to John Hibbert, a Bellcomm, Inc. employee in the late 1950s and 1960s. Bellcomm was a subsidiary of AT&T (Bell Labs) organized to assist the NASA HQ Office of Space Flight. Hibbert was referenced on one distribution list as "Director, System Analysis."
  • Aleck C. Bond Papers
    • This collection represents the material Aleck Bond gathered for his personal files outside of his work papers, which were donated to the JSC History Collection. The bulk of the collection addresses his work with Eagle Engineering, Inc. as an Industrial Space Facility project manager. The Industrial Space Facility was conceived by Maxime Faget, founder and president of Space Industries, Inc. as a commercial alternative to the faltering Space Station Freedom project. Other small groups of documents collected from his years with NASA may have been used as reference materials while working on the Industrial Space Facility.
  • Richard Boudreau Apollo Mission Techniques Documents, 1966-1967
    • This is a collection of three “Apollo Mission Techniques” documents. The “TRW Rendezvous Study Briefing Charts” contains view charts used in briefing ASPO’s Dr. Shea and those MSC organizations responsible for developing the Apollo Lunar Orbit Rendezvous techniques. Studies like this are representative of the early TRW efforts to establish the priority and use of alternate GNC data sources. The two “Apollo Mission Techniques” Working Papers contain much of the data priority work accomplished before Bill Tindall was appointed ASPO Chief of Apollo Data Priority Coordination. These two documents were the starting point for the extensive Apollo Mission Techniques effort that was continued under Bill Tindall’s direction, up until the first moon landing in July 1969.
  • Richard Burghduff Papers
    • This collection represents material Richard Burghduff gathered from his personal work files while employed by the U.S. government at NASA Johnson Space Center. The focus of this collection includes general NASA information along with information related to his work in the development and management of the Space Shuttle crew cockpit subsystems.
  • Debbie Carter Papers
    • The Debbie Carter Papers consist of documents from the US and Canadian space programs, dating from 1958 to 1986. The collection documents the working relationship between the two nations, and includes information about the Canadian satellite ‘Alouette’ and the Remote Manipulator System subcontracted by a Canadian company for the NASA Space Shuttle program. The papers also include text and notes from interviews of NASA executives Robert Day, Al Louviere, Clay McCullough, and Kemble Johnson.
  • Norman Chaffee Papers
    • Norman Chaffee attended Rice University and Tulsa University, and received a BS and MS in Chemical Engineering (1961, 1962). His roles at the Manned Spacecraft Center/Johnson Space Center included Aerospace Engineer in the Analysis and Application Section of the Propulsion and Power Division (1962-1975), Head of the Analysis and Application Section (1975-1979), Deputy Chief of the Propulsion and Power Division (1980-1984, 1987-1990), Assistant Manager for Integration in the Systems Engineering and Integration Office of the Space Station Program Office (1984-1987), Manager of Systems Engineering and Integration Office of the Lunar/Mars Exploration Office (1990-1991), Acting Manager of the Lunar/Mars Exploration Office (1991), Deputy Chief of Automation, Robotics, and Simulation Division (1991-1996), and Deputy Manager of the Biomedical Hardware Development and Engineering Office (1996). He retired from Johnson Space Center in 1996, but then worked in the JSC Public Affairs’ Education and Information Services Branch until 1998. The collection contains memos written by Chaffee, as well as papers he wrote and presented (with notes), patent information, and personnel-related records.
  • Paul Cicci Collection
    • Paul Cicci was born and raised in Chicago, Illinois. As a youth he became interested in aviation and the NASA space program. He started building model airplanes in the late 1950s-early 1960s, when he got the idea to write to the NASA astronauts for the Gemini Program. After receiving a letter back from John Glenn, Cicci began writing to all of the astronauts of the Gemini and Apollo Programs, along with other NASA luminaries. He also began collecting astronaut photographs, magazines, and newspapers between 1962 and 2004. Cicci focused on collecting for early Apollo astronauts’ photographs with signatures, signed letters, magazines, and newspapers.
  • Aaron Cohen Papers
    • Aaron Cohen was born in Corsicana, Texas on January 5, 1931. After graduating from Texas A&M University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering in 1952, Cohen served as a U.S. Army officer for two years during the Korean War era. On returning to civilian life, he worked for RCA as a microwave tube design engineer from 1954 to 1958, whereupon he moved to General Dynamics Corporation. In 1958, Cohen received a Master of Science degree in Applied Mathematics from Stevens Institute of Technology.

    • In 1962, Cohen joined NASA as a structures and materials engineer in the Spacecraft Research Division. He assumed positions of progressively greater responsibility until he was named manager of the Apollo Command and Service Modules in 1969. Cohen held this position until 1972, when he became manager of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Office. In this capacity, Cohen oversaw the design, development, production, and test flights of the Space Shuttle orbiters. In 1982, he was promoted to Director of Engineering at the Johnson Space Center, and four years later, he became director of the center. He served in that post until 1992. Aaron Cohen then served as the Acting Deputy Administrator of NASA between February 19, 1992, and November 1, 1992. In 1993, Cohen retired from NASA to become H.B. Zachry Professor of Engineering at Texas A&M University, his alma mater, while simultaneously serving as a senior technical advisor for Kistler Aerospace Corporation in Kirkland, Washington.

    • The collection covers Aaron Cohen’s career from 1954 to 2009 with biographical and personnel data; correspondence; writings, speeches, and interviews by Cohen; documents from RCA, NASA, and Texas A& M University; NASA presentations and proposals; honors and awards; reports and studies; slides and transparencies; publications; business cards; and DVD recordings of class lectures. Box 1 contains biographical data, correspondence, writings by Cohen, speeches and interviews by him, and schematic drawings from RCA. Box 2 contains other RCA documents and NASA presentations. Box 3 contains additional NASA presentations and proposals, information on honors and awards, information on Cohen’s participation in AeroAstro annual, and a report on space exploration cost. Box 4 contains NASA reports and studies as well as publications and newspaper clippings and flyers, slides, photographs, and transparencies. Box 5 contains miscellaneous documents, business cards, and DVDs of Cohen’s lectures at MIT.   

  • Allan DuPont Papers
    • The Allan DuPont Papers is composed of internal NASA presentations, professional presentations, memos, and other related documentation, from NASA employee Allan DuPont’s time working in the Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) Subsystem at NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, from 1963 to 2016. The majority of the collection consists PowerPoint-style presentation slide pages (printouts and transparencies). Topics within the collection include Rendezvous Proximity Operations & Capture Rendezvous (RPOC) between the International Space Station and various service vehicles; the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle; the European Space Agency Automated Transfer Vehicle; detailing of the development, testing and integration of the H-II Transfer vehicle and Automated Transfer Vehicle with NASA and the ISS; and other topics.

  • Henry Eggers Papers
    • Henry Eggers (who went by “Hank”) (1938-2012) was an Electronics Technician in the U.S. Navy. Shortly after leaving the U.S. Navy in the early 1960s, Eggers became a Field Engineer for General Dynamics Corporation. He was sent to Houston from San Diego, California, to work at NASA under contract on installing and maintaining the IBM 4020-Bitserver, as well as other computer and electronics equipment. He was responsible for the design of several circuits to improve the speed and efficiency of the system and conducted meetings with representatives from Kodak and Lockheed and showed demonstrations of the “4020” as they were interested in purchasing this type of equipment. The items in this collection consist of Manned Spacecraft Center/Johnson Space Center memorabilia from Eggers’ personal collection from his time working as a contractor for General Dynamics Corp. in the early 1960s.
  • John Eggleston Papers
    • The collection consists primarily of papers authored or co-authored by John Eggleston and reports, notes, and memorandum documenting NACA and NASA projects for which Eggleston was responsible or participated, primarily the Space Environment Division. Of particular interest are the handwritten notes on the Final Apollo 11 Flight Plan; and Eggleston’s notes and comments collected about post-Apollo planning from various project managers and NASA Administrator George Low. Also, the donation includes a copy of his MIT Alfred P. Sloan School of Management M.S. Thesis about Executive Selection & Development at NASA.
  • Maxime Faget Papers
    • Maxime Faget was born on August 26, 1921, in Stannis Creek, British Honduras (now Belize), and died on October 9, 2004, in Houston, Texas. After graduating from Louisiana State University, Faget served in the Submarine Service of the United States Navy during World War II. During his lifetime, Faget worked as a United States government employee, first at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) and then later as one of the founding employees of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Faget was on the design team for the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle vehicles and held several key patents for both Mercury and Shuttle. Dr. Faget lived in Dickinson, Texas, while he worked at NASA.
  • Joe D. Gamble Papers
    • Joe D. Gamble was assigned to work with the group responsible for the aerodynamics and flight mechanics analysis for human spacecraft at NASA Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas, starting around 1963-1964. Gamble supported the Gemini and Apollo Programs by performing simulations and analyses of the Apollo launch escape system and entry capsule. He developed a twelve degree of freedom computer simulation for analyzing parachutes and payloads, that was eventually used by NASA Langley Research Center in support of the Viking Mars missions. Joe Gamble helped develop the aerodynamic requirements for the Space Shuttle Orbiter. He was a member of the team responsible for the development and verification of the Orbiter entry flight control system.

    • Between 1986 and 1988, Gamble manage the aerocapture and landing portion of contracts with Martin Marietta, Lockheed Missiles and Space Corporation, and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in support of a project intended to return a soil sample from Mars. Between 1990 and 1993, Joe Gamble served as NASA’s Chief Engineer for the Space Station Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) project, where he directed the efforts of 35 NASA engineers. As Chief Engineer, he managed the engineering portions of ACRV contracts with Rockwell International, Lockheed Missiles, and Space Corporation.

    • The Joe D. Gamble Papers is composed of original materials Joe D. Gamble gathered from his personal work files while employed at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, from his time working there between around 1963 and 1993. Most of the material in this collection is from his time as the Chief Engineer for the Assured Crew Return Vehicle (ACRV) Program, that began under the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Program and then transitioned to the International Space Station (ISS) Program. It covers his work with the Soviet Union on the use by NASA of the use of a modified Russian Soyuz vehicle for the Space Station rescue vehicle.

  • John R. Garman Papers
    • John R. Garman was born in Oak Park, Illinois on September 11, 1944. He obtained a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Physics from the University of Michigan in 1966. That same year, Garman began working for the Johnson Space Center as Director of Flight Operations for the Mission Planning and Analysis Division of the Flight Support Division. During the Apollo 11 flight, Garman’s knowledge of the computer aboard Apollo 11 saved the historic first lunar landing from a last-minute abort when alarms sounded in a back room of Mission Control. He obtained progressively more responsible positions until he was appointed Deputy Director of the Mission Support Directorate in 1986. The following year, Garman went to Washington, D.C. as Director of Information Systems Services at the Space Station Program Office. On returning to the Johnson Space Center in 1988, Garman held a variety of positions, culminating in Chief Information Officer in 1994. He left NASA in 2000 and joined OAO Corporation in Greenbelt, Maryland. Lockheed Martin Information Technology of Seabrook, Maryland bought out OAO, and Garman became Technical Director, NASA Services for Lockheed Martin Information Technology. In 2010, Garman retired and became a consultant in software engineering and information technology. John R. Garman died on September 16, 2016.
  • Kenneth R. Goodwin Papers (HSF-60)
    • The Kenneth R. Goodwin is composed of internal NASA and MIT Instrumentation Laboratory (now Charles Stark Draper Laboratory), memorandums, space guidance analysis memos, and research and procedure booklets for the operations of Project Apollo and space flight missions, used and kept by Kenneth R. Goodwin between 1965-1972. Goodwin used the materials while working as an Apollo Program test engineer executing functional tests in the hardware-software area of the optical/radar subsystems for the Apollo vehicles, including while assigned to the Lab’s Field Site Office at the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC). Included in the collection are the memorandums of Howard W. “Bill” Tindall, Jr. between 1966-1970, known as Tindallgrams, documenting technical decisions for all unmanned and manned flights through Apollo 13. A large portion of the collection are the MIT Space Guidance Analysis Memos which include research topics spanning between 1965-1968 from multiple engineers that guided space travel for the Apollo Missions, including research on position and velocity uncertainties for lunar missions. The MIT Apollo Guidance, Navigation, and Control booklets cover a majority amount of the collection and are limited published books spanning between 1965-1972, they were used and kept by Goodwin during his time at NASA, covering topics such as a system operations plan for manned LM earth orbital and lunar missions using program luminary IA.
  • Lawrence D. Guy Papers
    • Lawrence D. Guy was born and raised in Winfield, Kansas. Education at Kansas University was interrupted by World War II. Underwent Army Aviation Cadet training and was commissioned in March 1944. Served as Photo Recon Pilot in Europe until May 1945. Guy received a B.S. degree in Aeronautical Engineering from Kansas University in June 1947. He worked as Design Engineer with Chance-Vought Aircraft, Connecticut for one year. Guy entered duty with NASA al Langley Research Center in Virginia in 1948.
    • His early work was concerned with supersonic aircraft control effectiveness and became Supervisor of the Langley 9-by-12 inch Supersonic Blowdown Tunnel in 1953. Guy received his Masters degree from the University of Virginia in 1956. He was later responsible for research planning and development of dynamic model testing techniques for the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel. He was transferred to the Structures Research Division in 1959 as Assistant Head of the Aero-Thermal Facilities Branch with responsibility for direction of research programs. As Assistant Head of the Structural Mechanics Branch, his primary responsibilities were in planning research programs in the field of aerothermoelasticitiy, for the 9-by6 Foot Thermal Structures Tunnel and the 8-Foot High Temperature Structures Tunnel. Based on information contained in Guy’s files, it seemed he was very much involved in the analysis and studies at the causes of Panel Flutter in aircraft/space vehicle caused by the loads and dynamics of the atmosphere during subsonic and supersonic travel.
    • Programs and projects that Guy worked on throughout his career included; Atlas-Centaur Program, Voyager Project, Scout Program, Dyna-Soar Project, X-15 Project, Eagle Air Missile Program, Space Shuttle Program and Orbiter Experiment (OEX) System, Viking Program, and analysis in relation to atmospheric reentry for planetary vehicles such as the Mars Entry vehicles. Early on in the Space Shuttle Program, Guy worked on supporting analysis in the areas of aerothermodynamics, loads and structures and Vehicle Flight Control. Early in his career, Lawrence Guy was author of many technical papers and reports for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) and later on as NACA became the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). His career spanned from 1948 through 1978.
  • Howard Hall Collection (in-process)
  • Richard Hermling Collection
    • Richard Hermling was born February 2, 1943 in Highland Park, Michigan. While in high school, he worked two paper routes—one morning and one evening—while taking college prep courses and playing varsity baseball. When his father was laid off and unable to pay for him to go to college, Hermlinger enlisted in the U.S. Air Force so he could get their educational benefits. While serving in the Air Force, he began attending college and he also worked at McDonald’s part-time to make ends meet.
    • While stationed at Ellsworth Air Force Base, Hermlinger met his future wife Linda Wegner. After his military enlistment ended, the Hermlingers moved to Houston, Texas, where Richard got a job working at the NASA Johnson Space Center. He worked long hours at NASA while attending college part-time and completing his engineering degree. Among his many accomplishments while at NASA, Hermlinger was most proud of the fact that in 1967 NASA built a prototype of the Apollo spacesuit for him, which he tested in Chamber A of Building 32 at Johnson Space Center. That spacesuit is now in the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum. After retiring from NASA, Richard and Linda Hermlinger started and built their own small fledgling company, Southwest Seminars, into a successful nationwide company. Richard Hermlinger passed away on March 20, 2020, in Friendswood, Texas.
    • This collection primarily includes magazines, photographs, journals and reports, directories, periodicals, personal correspondence and documentation of NASA projects, and other materials, from Hermlinger's time working at Johnson Space Center.
  • Robert Heselmeyer Papers
    • The Robert Heselmeyer Papers contains reports, memos, notebooks, technical manuals and handbooks, dictionaries, checklists, guides, flight schedules, technical requirements records, meeting logs, activity reports, plans, charts, and other materials, documenting the entire career of Robert Heselmeyer at NASA’s Johnson Space Center (JSC) from 1966 to 2004. He worked as an engineer on the Project Apollo missions as a Lunar Module Flight Controller, specifically as the Vehicle Systems Engineer for the Telemetry, Electrical, and (EVA) Mobility Unit (or TELMU). Heselmeyer served as a Biomedical Experiments Flight Controller for the medical experiments on the Skylab Program. He worked from the mid-1970s through the 1980s in Space Shuttle flight support positions within the National Space Transportation System (NSTS) Program Office.
    • The largest and most significant set of materials in the collection are original manuals, handbooks, and schedules from Heselmeyer’s role with the Apollo 11 and Apollo 13 missions. All of the materials in the collection pertaining to specific mission or projects to which Heselmeyer was assigned were actually used during his work on those various assignments at Johnson Space Center.
  • Paul F. Horsman Papers
    • The Paul F. Horsman Papers is composed of meeting notes, notebooks, calendars, memos, engineering drawings, engineering calculations and notes, research information, memos, design plans, planning records, Space Shuttle crew compartment configuration drawing booklets, published reports, booklets, published presentations, published conference proceedings, contractor reports and manuals, NASA publications, NASA handbooks and manuals, NASA strategic plans, telephone directories, photographs, and miscellaneous materials, created and used by NASA Johnson Space Center engineer Paul F. Horsman. Horsman worked for NASA as one of the original 40 engineers and scientists with NASA’s Space Force Task Force in Langley, Virginia. He worked from 1962 to 1997 at NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, Texas.

    • Horsman worked in various divisions and offices at NASA for the Mercury and Apollo programs from 1959 to the early 1970s, before turning to work on Space Shuttle orbiter engineering work. The main two departments in which he worked were the Electro-mechanical Systems Section of the Guidance and Control Division of the Engineering Directorate, and Space Shuttle Integration and Operations Office. Some of the most unique materials in the collection include Horsman’s personal meeting and engineering notebooks; orbiter crew compartment configuration drawings; design records and research on addressing addressed the issues of stabilization of magnetic torquers, which were used on the Apollo missions and in early design work for the Space Shuttle; and Horsman’s engineering drawings of the Mercury capsule design, and the designs for the Mercury flight simulator created between September 1959 and April 1960.

  • Frank Hughes Papers
    • Francis E. Hughes (who goes by "Frank") earned his BS in physics at St. Mary's College, California; and a MS degree in environmental management at the University of Houston-Clear Lake. Hughes served as the chief of NASA’s Johnson Space Center Spaceflight Training Division. He spent more than 30 years with NASA, working spaceflight training in Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Space Shuttle, Space Station and future exploration programs, training the flight crews, the flight controllers, and the trainers. He was a computer and GNC expert during Apollo Training. He trained Shuttles crews in GC and computer systems; then he became manager with increasing responsibilities. He left Shuttle training to initiate Space Station training in 1982. Hughes pioneered the training cooperation with all of the ISS partners including Russia. He retired from NASA and is currently heading up some new training efforts in the aerospace community. This collection contains Hughes' work records covering the dates 1967 to 1999.
  • Human Space Flight Reference Collection
    • The Human Space Flight Reference Collection contains brochures, pamphlets, educational handouts, programs, flyers, guides, articles, and miscellaneous materials, collected by the University of Houston-Clear Lake Archives and Special Collections to document NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The materials were originally organized as the “NASA/JSC Vertical Subject Files” beginning in 2001, when the Archives began collecting materials pertaining to the local Johnson Space Center (JSC) facility. The materials generally represent published and printed materials intended for the public, including educators and the media, highlighting NASA and space exploration programs. Many of the pieces of ephemera who produced as public relations materials by JSC’s Public Affairs Office. Many of the items were published by NASA, JSC, and various internal departments, as well as other NASA facilities outside of Texas. The collection also includes magazine and newspaper publications, organizational event materials, and space exploration educational and cultural content, produced and distributed by non-NASA entities.
  • Carl Huss Papers
    • Carl R. Huss joined the Mission Analysis Branch of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory at NACA in 1959. His work involved trajectory analysis for the launch, orbit, and re- entry of the Mercury capsule, taking into account the evolving mission rules and constraints. This Section developed nominal and contingency trajectories and numerous abort conditions for different missions and determined the logic and equations for the computers. As lead engineers for the Mercury Atlas orbital flights, Huss worked closely with John Mayer, Clay Hicks, Charlie Allen, Ted Skopinski, and John Maynard on the preliminary definition of the mission planning process. Having specialized in planning the de-orbit maneuver, he became the first Retrofire Officer (RETRO) in the Mercury Control Center. Later Huss moved with the Mission Analysis Branch to Houston and continued supporting the flights out of Cape Mercury Control Center. A mild heart attack shortly after Project Mercury was concluded with the MA-9 flight in May 1963 prompted Huss to move into management of the newly named Mission Analysis and Planning Division. In 1967 he became the Assistant Chief for Mission Design, a position that he held through the duration of the distinguished career. He received the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal in 1981.
  • Herb Kavanaugh Personal Papers
    • Herb Kavanaugh graduated from Texas A&M University with a Bachelor’s degree in Aeronautical Engineering and began his professional engineering career with General Dynamics in Fort Worth, Texas in 1959. After three years in the B-58 wing design group, Kavanaugh returned to Texas A&M to complete work on his Master of Science degree. Upon completion, he joined the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at Clear Lake, Texas, as an Aerospace Engineer in the Structural Analysis Section of the Structural Mechanics Branch within the Structures and Mechanics Division.
    • His NASA career within the Structures and Mechanics Division spanned 28 years. It started with the early design phases of the Apollo program and ended while the Shuttle program was at its peak. While at NASA he served as an Engineering Specialist for the preparation and review of structural analysis of load bearing components and was responsible for the design, analysis, and evaluation of major structural subsystems for advanced spacecraft and for the Space Station Freedom. He was also a member of the preliminary design team for the Space Shuttle affectionately known as the “Skunk Works.” During the Shuttle Program, Kavanaugh was responsible for the structural strength and life integrity certification of certain space vehicle subsystem components as well as the payloads and experiments that were to be carried by the Shuttle. He holds one group patent for the design of a Triangular Space Station Configuration and is a registered engineer in the state of Texas. The collection contains 18 boxes of materials pertaining to the work of Herbert C. Kavanaugh from the period of 1942-1992. The collection includes personal letters, memoranda, technical reports, handbooks, journals, periodicals, numeric data, photographs, structural reports, and annual reports.
  • Robert M. Kelso Papers
    • The Robert M. Kelso Papers is composed of flight manuals, handbooks, checklists, press kits, memorandums, telephone directories, and miscellaneous materials, used and kept by Robert M. Kelso while he worked as flight controller and later lead flight director in Flight Operations in Mission Control Center at NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The bulk of the materials are handbooks, flight manuals, and console binders used by Kelso during the first three Space Shuttle Orbiter missions STS-1, STS-2, and STS-3, while working as a flight controller for the Shuttle between 1981 and 1982. There are also operational manuals, binders, and other records from the Space Shuttle missions STS-5, STS-8, STS-12, and STS-13. One of the more unique items in the collection is Kelso’s original National Space Transportation System reference press kit binder from 1988, providing information shared with the public regarding the Space Shuttle STS program.

  • John Kiker Papers
    • John W. Kiker began his career as a pilot trainer in WWII, flying B-52’s. He had a long career with NASA, and designed the parachute and descent systems for Mercury, Gemini and Apollo spacecraft. He also assisted in designing the landing and docking systems for the lunar module and the Apollo command module. By 1971, he was chief of the Mechanisms Branch in the Spacecraft Design Division. Kiker always was ready to share credit for ideas that worked, but the one for which he is best known within NASA is one he developed entirely on his own, and for which many of his colleagues at first questioned his sanity. Kiker’s idea – to carry the orbiter on the back of a modified Boeing 747—was met with initial skepticism, but the utility of his idea was finally proven in full-scale approach and landing tests of the shuttle Enterprise at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., in October 1977. Today the image of the space shuttle riding piggyback on one of NASA’s two shuttle carrier aircraft is a well-recognized part of the program’s history. John Kiker passed away in 2005 at the age of 79. This collection contains material pertaining to the work of John W. Kiker from the period of 1945-1998 including technical manuals, correspondence, presentations, meeting minutes, and reports.
  • John H. Kimzey Papers
    • John Howard Kimzey started to work at the Johnson Space Center as a chemical engineer. He was nationally renowned as an expert in flammability, specifically in the oxygen atmosphere of manned spacecraft, and extinguishment in an oxygen environment. As Principal Investigator for Skylab 4, he performed individual experiments under Technology and Materials Processing focused on Zero-G Flammability. His work demonstrated that it would be hard to control and direct water in space, which meant that it would not be sufficient to put out a fire. Until 1991, his fire experiments in a combustion chamber were the only combustion-related study conducted on a spacecraft. His work on the effects of various fire extinguishing agents in special atmospheres was useful in the development of techniques and equipment for manned spacecraft. The experiments and investigation performed on Skylab 4 formed the rest of his career and made him a pioneering expert for decades to come in this important and underdeveloped field of research.
    • Kimzey analyzed the data that was gathered from Mercury and observed issues that could affect future manned spacecraft, after which he defined problem areas in flammable and toxic materials. He demonstrated that materials for use on a manned spacecraft needed to be selected with primary attention to crew safety in order to keep them safe from toxic and flammable gases. He was involved with experiments during the Gemini project involving microgravity flights and throughout Gemini it was a major goal to perfect methods of safe reentry. This was an issue that Kimzey also focused on because he was concerned with the materials that were used in space and how they would affect the health of the space team and how those materials would react under the direct pressures and heat of a changing external environment while maintaining an internal oxygen environment.
    • His work during Apollo continued to develop knowledge of flammability in spacecraft. He continued study of materials, lubricants, and specific clothes and how they would react in oxygen-rich environments with a manned crew aboard. He was ever insistent on the importance of testing flammability scenarios and safety aboard a manned spacecraft. Following the Apollo 13 supercritical oxygen tank incident, Kimzey wrote Review of Factors Affecting Ignition of Metals in High Pressure Oxygen Systems which provided summaries of reported data and emphasized the effects of “oxygen concentration; total pressure; convection, including zero gravity; oxygen percentage; and halogenated compounds on ignition.” He continued to contribute to the Shuttle program from its conception until his death in 2004.
  • Helen Lane Papers
    • Dr. Helen W. Lane is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Johnson Space Center (JSC) Chief Nutritionist and Manager of the NASA JSC University Research and Affairs Office. Her research career started with the relationship of selenium, zinc, and copper nutritional status during the life cycle, and with diseases including breast and head neck cancers. She also studied energy-exercise relationships in rodent mammary tumor genesis. At NASA, she focused on energy metabolism as well as food quality, body composition and general nutritional needs. Dr. Lane has held various management positions at NASA including branch chief, division chief-scientist, Program Manager for Advanced Human Support Technology, Assistant to the Director for Intramural Research and Assistant to the Director for Advance Programs. This collection includes NASA and non-NASA documents and publications as well as work papers for Helen Lane from 1972 to 2014.
  • Charles Laubach Papers
    • This collection contains the work papers of Charles H. Laubach (who went by "Chuck"), who served as a NASA Johnson Space Center logistics and maintenance engineer from 1958 until 2006. Laubach began his aerospace industrial career in San Diego, California, under General Dynamics--Convair Astronautics after graduation from Texas A&M University in 1958 with a Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering. In 1962, Laubach moved back to Texas to begin his 25 year service with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. There, he dedicated his life as a design and logistics engineer for landmark projects such as the Atlas--Centauri, Project Orbiter, and Apollo Missions. While with NASA, Laubach worked on environmental acceptance testing (EAT), integrated logistics Support (ILS), logistics support analysis (LSA), and logistics support analysis records (LSAR).
    • In 1987, Laubach left NASA and began a career working alongside McDonnel--Douglas and for the Boeing Company where he continued to act as a logistics engineer for the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and his tireless work with the International Space Station Program (ISSP). While at Boeing, Laubach stood out amongst his peers and lead several projects in designing from start to finish various logistics efforts. He designed manuals and rafted presentations on the importance of logistical engineering and applied ground maintenance of grounded space shuttles and ISSP technology. While working with the ISSP, Laubach was able to travel to foreign nation-states, such as Italy and the Netherlands, in an effort to collaborate with nations around the world to maintain the vision of a united humanity undergoing space exploration. The majority of the Laubach collection spans over his years with Boeing while working in collaboration with NASA and the Johnson Space Center (JSC). The collection includes documentation from General Dynamics, Convair Astronautics, Apollo Environmental Acceptance Testing (EAT), McDonnel--Douglas, United Space Alliance (USA), Space Shuttle Program (SSP), International Space Station Program (ISSP), Logistics Support Analysis (LSA), Logistics Support Analysis Record (LSAR), Logistics and Maintenance (LM), and Integrated Logistic Support (ILS), Department of Defense (DOD) and Military Standard contracts.
  • Anna Louden Papers
    • Anna Louden worked at NASA’s Manned Spacecraft Center in the Aerodynamics and Entry Technology Section during the years of 1963-1973. Her most notable project was Project Apollo, and her efforts were contributed to Apollo missions 7-11. During this period she received several achievement awards and also co-wrote a NASA internal paper on variational problems. The collection contains one box of materials pertaining to the work of Anna Louden from the period of 1963-1973. The collection includes correspondence, photographs, artwork, awards, and other materials.
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